HOW EXAMINATION MALPRACTICE SAVED MY LIFE (A Lesson Learnt) – Part 2

*This is the second and final part of this article; if you haven’t read the part one, you may read it here https://wealthymotivator.wordpress.com/2014/02/12/how-examination-malpractice-saved-my-life-a-lesson-learnt-part-1/

I HAVE ALWAYS THOUGHT highly of myself – there’s nothing worse than being caught cheating; I felt the greatest punishment was to be shamed before my course mates, and my girlfriend was sited next to me. I quickly resolved that it was more honorable to ‘fail’ ‘gracefully’ and come back for the re-sit the next session than be shamed for malpractice – malpractice!

I walked out (not like Morpheus as I had planned but like a chicken beaten in the rain), without writing a thing on my answers script.
I learnt a great lesson that day that has stuck with me till today and I have resolved to tell my kids and grand kids this story over and over again to teach and remind them of that important lesson – which is, do not, for whatsoever reason, be caught unprepared. Be always ready. Do your due diligence.

Of course we already know it that success in any endeavor – life and work – does not just happen; it takes preparation and action. You can only act rightly when you are properly prepared. For that examination, I wasn’t and I failed.

Understand, for everything that you will ever want or desire to accomplish in life and whatever work you may do, there are certain courses of action that you would need to take to get yourself ready for success. If you’re not prepared you will fail, no doubt. And if you’re not prepared you’ll know it.

In life, sometimes, you will get ideas, thoughts, inspirations, on the right course of action, make a move while you still can; learn all that you can and or need to, because judgment day will come when you will no longer have the time to do anything but face the gavel.

The lack of preparation will cost you more than the lack of capital or so called ‘experience’.

When you are really prepared, you can stand in the day of trial and defend your honor, proudly, with your shoulders high.
Robert T. Kiyosaki, said, “The future will be very bright for those who prepare for it today.” Myles Munroe said “Your future is bright, whether you get there is up to you.” Read, research, ask questions, do what you have to do, get ready.

Opportunities will come, challenges will rise. If you’re not ready you’ll give up in the day of trial, which would mean that your strength is small, which would mean you were not properly prepared – you’re not ready. It pays to be ready. Don’t do what I did – you can cheat in an examination but you can’t cheat in life.

*Do you have any lessons that examination mal-practice taught you? Or any other? Please, do share with us in the comments section.

Follow me on Twitter: @WealthyJack

Stanley G. Jack is the author of “Who Took My Job?”(@WhoTookMyJob) and his next book “GOOD TO GO: How To Succeed In Life & Work After NYSC”, out in June 2014.

HOW EXAMINATION MALPRACTICE SAVED MY LIFE (A Lesson Learnt) – Part 1

*This is the first of a two-part essay; be sure to read the next instalment.

I WILL BE VERY FRANK with you here, and not try to bullshit you, in no way; during one of my examinations, many years ago, in my second semester of my Diploma in Law programme, I walked into the arena, as bold and poised as Don Corleone in the movie ‘The Godfather’. As far as I was concerned this particularly exam was already a walk-over, done and dusted and at a 100% grade. We were sitting for ‘Constitutional & Administrative Law’ by barrister Felix.

Few minutes into the exam my boldness and Don Corleone’s poise suddenly dissipated, my heart began beating faster than I could spell my own name; I began feeling like a smuggler who had wraps of cocaine concealed in his pants and here standing before the smart immigration officer who had detected and arrested the two others in front of me. The examination arena became uncomfortable and I had started sweating – like a Christmas goat. My God!

I looked at the exam papers before me, seeing that I was ‘familiar’ with every question in it was no consolation – it rather made me feel worse. I looked at the answers booklet, it was empty – I hadn’t written a single word on it except my examination credentials.

Something significant had happened the night before; at about 10:PM, I had picked up the course materials. As I opened the books I instantly and ‘miraculously’ began feeling like Moses receiving the Ten Commandments from Jehovah on Mount Sinai – I mean, I was getting strong inspirations and conviction on some particular topics – my spirit and mind and all my body language were in sync, saying to me (sort of) “Jack, read these places. Don’t dull now. They’re coming out for the exam tomorrow.” For some inexplicable reason I chose to not heed the ministration of that still voice; instead I cut out tiny pieces of paper and copied out these topics that were ‘jumping’ at me.

The lecturer for this course was a jovial personality until he chooses to really get serious. We liked him more when he was jovial. The morning of the exam, in my socks, and under the lining of my belt and wallet were tucked different pieces of tiny papers containing possible answers to anticipated questions, so that I knew where to touch for each item.

So that as soon as I starred at my question paper and to my uttermost amazement, they were as exactly as I had written them out in these tiny pieces of paper I now had on me. With these tiny pieces, all I had to do was root them out one after another and literally ‘pour’ them unto my answers booklet and then the examination would be over and I would walk out of the arena feeling cooler than Morpheus in the movie ‘The Matrix.’

Then I got the biggest shock; five minutes into the examination, two of my course mates had been apprehended cheating, with ‘exhibits’ – to nail them, their scripts torn apart, and disgracefully they were thrown out of the examination arena. We all knew what that meant – automatic failure and ‘carry-over’. Not only that, if they got charged to the Examination Disciplinary Committee, they were facing expulsion. What an embarrassment.

Now, there I sat, paralyzed with fear and inaction. I kept thinking how in the world was he able to pick out the two smartest cheats, in the whole of the arena, in just five minutes of start time? How? Was he using some supernatural influence? I couldn’t understand it. Would I get caught if cheated too? I couldn’t tell.

A very simple examination, this was, yet I couldn’t write a word on paper because I didn’t do what I was supposed to do the night before – I didn’t read. And now, I couldn’t bring out my ‘bullets’.

To be continued…

Please drop your comments. Thanks.

Follow me on Twitter: @WealthyJack

Stanley G. Jack is the author of “Who Took My Job?”(@WhoTookMyJob) and his next book “GOOD TO GO: How To Succeed In Life & Work After NYSC”, out in June 2014.

SOMEBODY GIVE ME A JOB!

I got to know Fred few months ago when he was just about to be discharged from the National Youth Service. I asked him what he would be doing after service; he said, “look for a job”. It’s over six months, and he’s still not engaged with work – waiting for someone to give him a job. He had being brainwashed.

Our society has succeeded in brainwashing us that we need work in someone else’s business after graduation, instead of creating our own work and building our own businesses. It did not start today. Many years ago before the amalgamation of what they called ‘Southern and Northern protectorates’ in 1914 by the British colonial lords, every people who occupied the spaces that made up Nigeria were naturally entrepreneurs. For instance, the people of the Oyo Empire, the Benin Kingdom, the Kanuri Empire, to mention a few, had already established for themselves a civilization and entrepreneurship-based economy. They farmed, produced and paid royalties or taxes to the ‘Landlords’ or the king – everyone and every family worked for themselves.

When the British colonial masters arrived and defeated these native people through the superiority of their boats and weapons they changed the prevalent economic order and established a different kind of civilization and economy, one based on employee-ship.

They built factories, schools, churches and other businesses. They needed cheap labour to run and grow these establishments; it is interesting to note what they had to do – train the ‘primitive natives’ with just enough information and expertise to be dependent and never self-reliant — just enough to be able to do the jobs as the white man required. Those natives who gained British education were promoted as the most-refined, best and most intelligent and superior human beings among their kinsmen; everything and everyone else were regarded as crude and barbaric. Soon, everyone began believing in the theories and superiority of the white man; then no matter who you were, you worked for the colonial masters as an employee one way or another. Cheap labour and loyal employees were what they wanted and what they succeeded in instilling into those who went to school. Those natives who studied and chose their own paths were labeled ‘rebels’ who must be disciplined.
Nigeria was established as a base of cheap labour and raw materials for the British and foreign industries. After ‘Independence’ from British (and colonial) rule in 1960, our political leaders inherited a system and economy designed not to ‘empower’ and ‘liberate’ people economically but a system of servitude – where most people are only educated enough to serve or do the work required for a fixed amount of money that would never be enough. It has been a long time, and people have forgotten how to be entrepreneurs – productive and self-reliant. The mentality had been formed and perpetuated – to go to school and prove how a zombie you can be by taking orders and doing as you are told (slaves without creative thinking). Then you get fired at the caprice of your employer/master.

Today we have a society where most people, like my nice friend, Fred, think the only thing they can do is seek a job as an employee upon graduation from College or University. That is the effect of the brainwashing. And we have become worse for it. Young people graduate and many months or years after can’t find or create their own jobs. It is pathetic (!) and there needs to be a change. We need a re-building of our mentality, a re-orientation; one that is geared towards self-reliance, individual value and productivity.

When people seek employment it’s not necessarily because they love the job or their boss; they need the money that comes at week or month-end (this is the carrot which keeps the donkey working harder until its back breaks).

In less than six days thousands of Batch “A” ’13 Corps members across Nigeria will be ‘passing out’ from the National Youth Service. My question is, will you be asking “Somebody give me a job!”? If nobody wants to give you a job, create one for yourself and become a job-provider for others.

I say, think differently – your target should be to create and own your work. Kill the brainwashing.


Culled from the book “GOOD TO GO: How to succeed in life and work after NYSC” by Stanley G. Jack, coming out in June. All rights Reserved.

Follow me on Twitter: @WealthyJack

Stanley G. Jack is the author of “Who Took My Job?”(@WhoTookMyJob) and his next book “GOOD TO GO: How To Succeed In Life & Work After NYSC”, out in June 2014.

A DEGREE, YOUR FUTURE, SUCCESS & HAPPINESS

I graduated with a First Class there; 2’1 here; up till now I have no use for my degree(s). The only real education had been the experiences. I had fun; I like fun.

A foundation built on degree(s) is a false foundation; it will soon crumble like a pack of cards, like a house built on sands – the waters of economic instability will wash ’em away, faster than was built. It doesn’t matter what job you have or what position you are at, if a degree made you, that same degree will unmake you because degrees expire. And soon will yours.

ASUU is in the 6th month of its national strike and struggle with the Federal Government of Nigeria. The government is now trying to muzzle them back to class; most students are praying the matter resolved so they could go back and finish their programmes and obtain the much anticipated degree(s).
Six months’ been wasted doing nothing. No body told these students that 6 months was more than enough to start a life, to build a dream; to lay a good foundation for the future. They trust in a degree. Don’t.

They have a simple plan – go to school, get a degree, get a job. And it’s just what most of their parents expect of them. The same parents who followed same path and are now facing unprecedented financial challenges that they have no idea what to do about.

Plan the foundation of your life outside of whatever degree or school you attend(ed). Life does not actually recognise fancy-designer degrees.

Be a person of recreative/renewable value independent of a degree. And make the world a better place. There, will lie your relevance, wealth and happiness. The earlier you recognise that your degree is useless, the better for you.


Stanley G. Jack is the author of “Who Took My Job?”(@whotookmyjob) – coming soon!

Follow him on Twitter:@wealthyJACK

HOW 2 MAKE TIME STAND STILL FOR YOU

I remember when we were kids, we used to dream all kinds of noble and great dreams. Some of my friends/play mates would say they wanted to be SuperMan after watching the film. Some others said they wanted to be Policemen because we had a police-officer neighbour whom all the kids in the neighbourhood feared. And so forth.

Then we grew up and became different things apart from all what we had “wanted” to become when we “grow” up. Aside the (occasional loss of) interest, we grew up and realised that we didn’t have all the time to do all the things we had thought, dreamt and proclaimed; so we just forgot about the dreams.

Aren’t dreams for doing?. They are to be achieved and not forgotten. But there’s a little problem – we don’t have all the time to really do everything; often times, we make time our biggest opposition instead of getting time as our biggest ally.

One thing that remains dynamic and once lost is forever lost is time. Time is always moving – and fast. However, you can still have all the time in the world to do whatever and everything that you might ever dream to do or accomplish.

Get your goals straight and start doing something about it right away. If you are serious about accomplishing your goals/dreams and you are serious enough to do something about it right away, time would stand still for you untill you finish. If you are lazy and a procrastinator, time would leave you behind. Time is a spirit; and time respects doers and despises procrastinators.

Are you a doer or a procrastinator? Are you a talker without action? Think about it; deep down in you you know the answer to that question.

You may not have all the resources to accomplish everything you are set out for, but if you are an urgent doer time will respect you and call out the whole puzzle to fit in for your goals. That’s why they say that time settles all.

What do successful people (and billionaires) have in common? They make time work for them instead of against them by starting early – your early is today.

Start today and make time your biggest ally, instead of your biggest opposition. Time opposes procrastinators. Since the beginning of ages, time has always and will always zoom miles away from lazy folks who talk and don’t do. But time will always stand still for doers. All you need to do is become a doer and you will have time stand still for you. Isn’t that wonderful?


Stanley G. Jack is the author of “Who Took My Job?”(@whotookmyjob) – coming soon!

Follow him on Twitter:@wealthyJACK

HOW TO BE A FAILURE

When a person begins to think that he has “arrived,” he stops working hard. He stops striving to be the best in what he does.

And once a person stops striving to be the best he begins to decline, he loses his (first) salt. Then, very soon, he becomes a failure – a “used-to”.

The world is filled with multitudes of “used-tos”. ‘I used to be…’, ‘I used to do…’

Success in life is not about where you have been or what you have done. It is about where you are now and what you are doing, now. Success is a “Present” tense term, not a “Past” tense term.

Strive and keep striving. Treat both your successes and failures are past events and focus on the present and the future.

Meanwhile, success is an action word. So keep “doing”.


Stanley G. Jack is the author of “Who Took My Job?”(@whotookmyjob) – coming soon!

Follow him on Twitter:@wealthyJACK


Stanley G. Jack is the author of “Who Took My Job?”(@whotookmyjob) – coming soon!

Follow him on Twitter:@wealthyJACK

THREE MOST IMPORTANT ABILITIES IN LIFE

Anybody can be a lawyer, doctor, engineer and so forth. You simply go to school, finish and receive a certificate that declares you so – a professional. That’s great!

While I was still somewhere in my second year at the university, my family kept suggesting – “Finish your first degree. Then your Masters. Then your PhD. And then become a lecturer in a university. It is a safe, secure job and pensionable. And pays well too.” Then to sort of cajole my entrepreneurial spirit, “And you can always run your businesses on the side.”

I love my family. They love me too. They care about my future. I understand that.
I might get a PhD, but what for? To become a lecturer? I don’t think so. And that’s absolutely not what this post is about today.

Now, let’s get to today’s business; there are two things that seem most important to everyman – a secured or guaranteed economic and political future. Everyman is economic and political. Everything a man does is to secure these two primordials. Some men are willing to betray, kill, steal, lie, cheat on their family and friends, for the material guarantee of their economic and political future.

And that’s even why most people go to school. Some people say they go to school because they need a degree; why do you need a degree? Towards securing your economic and political future. That’s all.
Really. Everything else (if any) comes after.

But do you really need a degree to be economically and politically established in life? Do you really need to be a doctor, engineer or lawyer? Do you really need to spend good 3/4/5 years in school (an enclosed and limited environment) in pursuit of a piece of paper? What is the power and purpose of a degree? To show that you are truly educated and smart? Or to show…what could it be?

I don’t really believe that piece of paper is necessary. I don’t really think young people should waste anymore of their time and put their living on “hold” and be bored to death by uninteresting professors churning out out-dated theories because he confidently knows the students don’t even know any better.
Except you really loved to, need to, for a greater relevant reason, other than to secure your economic and political future, a degree is useless.

I don’t want to discourage anyone from attending college/university for a diploma. Go to school. Finish. Get your Masters. And maybe your PhD.
But, if all you are doing it for is so you can get a job upon graduation, then you are doing it for the wrong reason.
Besides, you can get a (read: create your own) job with just three simple yet important and powerful skills that you can master without having to waste years in college. They are so simple that most folks neglect or shy away from them. Yet, their potency is unquantifiable.

I’m simply talking about the skills of Reading, Writing, and Public speaking. If you can only master these important skills – you can become and have anything you want in life. Lack these skills, and you disadvantage yourself in an ever competitive and brutal world and a piece of paper won’t help you.

In my book: “Who Took My Job?” (To be released in October, 2013), I had written about these three important abilities and what they can do for you.
Most people are reading, but the wrong things; writing, but the wrong things, talking, but not really speaking. There’s a significant difference between ‘talking’ and ‘speaking’.
Every human being can talk. But public speaking is a learned skill.

The conclusion of the whole matter is that if you can read, write and speak, you can read, write and speak your way out of any unwanted situation (whether it is poverty, death etc) to every desired situation (happiness, riches, power and everything else you can dream of).

Whether you attend college or not, whether you get the finest degrees or not, you surely need to train yourself in the skills of Reading, Writing and Public speaking, then you are set for life. Lack these, and your degrees are useless, irrespective of their origin.

Most people can already read and at least write something. What has been lacking most is the “sharpening” that can produce powerful and best results.

Read more. Write more. Stop talking but, speak more. Consciously, with the aim of getting better. Your words need to be heavy weight and you will be perceived powerful, smart and influential. Then, you’re made.


Stanley G. Jack is the author of “Who Took My Job?”(@whotookmyjob) – coming soon!

Follow him on Twitter:@wealthyJACK